Patients with Skin Infections Fail to Complete Antibiotics, Leading to Poor Outcomes

Loren G. Miller, MD, MPH. Study Finds Nearly Half Get a New Infection or Require Additional Treatments
Loren G. Miller, MD, MPH. Study Finds Nearly Half Get a New Infection or Require Additional Treatments

In the first study of its kind, researchers found patients with S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections took, on average, just 57% of their prescribed antibiotic doses after leaving the hospital, resulting in nearly half of them getting a new infection or needing additional treatment for the existing skin infection.

New Formula Can Predict Professional Football Players’ Long-term Concussion Damages

Matthew J. Wright, PhD, an LA BioMed lead researcher and lead author of the paper published online in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Psychology.
Matthew J. Wright, PhD, an LA BioMed lead researcher and lead author of the paper published online in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Psychology.
Researchers studied the severity and frequency of game-related concussions among 40 former professional football players, many of whom had suffered cognitive deficits. The researchers combined this data with the estimates of each player’s cognitive reserve, a mechanism which helps protect the brain from injury. Cognitive reserve is developed through mentally enriching experiences, such as education and reading.   The researchers concluded that a unique combination of the harmful and the protective factors can predict cognitive outcomes in players who had suffered concussions during their football careers and have been retired from American professional football for an average of 20 years.