Patients with Skin Infections Fail to Complete Antibiotics, Leading to Poor Outcomes

Loren G. Miller, MD, MPH. Study Finds Nearly Half Get a New Infection or Require Additional Treatments
Loren G. Miller, MD, MPH. Study Finds Nearly Half Get a New Infection or Require Additional Treatments

In the first study of its kind, researchers found patients with S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections took, on average, just 57% of their prescribed antibiotic doses after leaving the hospital, resulting in nearly half of them getting a new infection or needing additional treatment for the existing skin infection.

New Formula Can Predict Professional Football Players’ Long-term Concussion Damages

Matthew J. Wright, PhD, an LA BioMed lead researcher and lead author of the paper published online in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Psychology.
Matthew J. Wright, PhD, an LA BioMed lead researcher and lead author of the paper published online in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Psychology.
Researchers studied the severity and frequency of game-related concussions among 40 former professional football players, many of whom had suffered cognitive deficits. The researchers combined this data with the estimates of each player’s cognitive reserve, a mechanism which helps protect the brain from injury. Cognitive reserve is developed through mentally enriching experiences, such as education and reading.   The researchers concluded that a unique combination of the harmful and the protective factors can predict cognitive outcomes in players who had suffered concussions during their football careers and have been retired from American professional football for an average of 20 years. 

Researchers Find Testosterone Treatment Improves Sexual Activity, Walking Ability and Mood in Men Over 65

The TTrials Reveal Benefits of Testosterone Treatment for Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels As men age, their testosterone levels decrease, but prior studies of the effects of administering testosterone to older men have been inconclusive. Now, research shows that testosterone treatment for men over 65 improves sexual function, walking ability and mood, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine by a team of researchers that included lead researchers from Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed).

LA BioMed to Honor Three of its Champions at 2016 Gala

Steve Nissen, George J. Mihlsten and the California Community Foundation to be Recognized
Steve Nissen, George J. Mihlsten and the California Community Foundation to be Recognized

Three exemplary champions of LA BioMed, whose contributions continue to fuel discoveries that hold promise for patients around the globe, will be honored with Spirit of Excellence Awards at the nonprofit research institute’s 2016 Gala on May 5 at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles.

New Hope for Improved Heart Disease Detection and Treatment in Type 2 Diabetics

Report Identifies Tools for Determining Risk and Prescribing Treatment

With approximately two-thirds of deaths among people with type 2 diabetes related to cardiovascular disease, a new report holds hope for improving the treatment of heart disease for one of the country’s and the world’s most at-risk populations.

New Study Holds Hope for Improving Outcomes for Children Exposed to Methamphetamine in the Womb

Supportive Home Environment May Reduce Behavioral and Emotional Issues

LOS ANGELES – Despite continuing reports that methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy can lead to behavioral and emotional problems in children, pregnant women continue to abuse the illicit drug. Nearly one-fourth of pregnant women seeking treatment at federal facilities were methamphetamine users.

Risk Factors for Weapon Involvement in Adolescents Vary by Race and Gender

Dr. Rashmi Shetgiri of Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, LA BioMed.
Dr. Rashmi Shetgiri of Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, LA BioMed.

Cincinnati, OH, January 14, 2016 -- In 2011, almost 13% of high school students had been victimized with weapons.  Weapon-related violence among adolescents can lead to injuries and long-term mental health problems.  In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that the risk and protective factors for carrying and using weapons vary by race and gender.

LA BioMed Researcher Honored for Distinguished Teaching

Dr. John Michael Criley Recognized for his major contributions to cardiovascular medicine
Dr. John Michael Criley Recognized for his major contributions to cardiovascular medicine

LOS ANGELES – John Michael Criley, MD, a Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) researcher, will receive the 2016 Distinguished Teacher Award from the American College of Cardiology on April 4 at the organization’s 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago, IL.

In notifying Dr. Criley of the award, the American College of Cardiology said he was being recognized for his “innovative, outstanding teaching characteristics and compassionate qualities. Because of these attributes, you have made major contributions to the field of cardiovascular medicine.”

Research Finds Parents Can Play a Role in Preventing Teen Fighting

Rashmi Shetgiri, MD, a LA BioMed lead researcher and corresponding author.
Rashmi Shetgiri, MD, a LA BioMed lead researcher and corresponding author.
Nearly one-fourth of all teens reported being involved in a physical fight in the past year, with higher rates of violent altercations among African American and Latino adolescents. In the first study of its kind, researchers conducted focus groups with African American and Latino parents regarding teen violence. Findings from their study suggested that addressing the parents’ attitudes about fighting, involving them in violence prevention programs and tailoring programs to different racial/ethnic groups may improve the effectiveness of prevention programs.

Medication shows Promise of Protecting Fertility and the Defense System during Chemotherapy

Christina Wang, MD
Christina Wang, MD

New Study Holds Hope for Avoiding Serious Side Effects of Cancer Treatment

LOS ANGELES – While targeted cancer treatments have reduced side effects and improved efficacy, chemotherapy remains the backbone of combination therapies for many forms of cancer. Unfortunately, cancer patients may suffer from several side effects from chemotherapy, including infertility and a weakened defense system that makes them susceptible to life-threatening infections.